Should the English celebrate Saint George's Day more?

23 April marks the day of St George, the Patron Saint of England. Legend has it that St George slew a dragon and saved a princess.

23rd April 2014
Dragon

23 April marks the day of St George, the Patron Saint of England. Legend has it that St George slew a dragon and saved a princess. Historical evidence however points to the 'real' St George living in Palestine in the third century who became a soldier in the Roman army and was executed for his Christian beliefs.

St George’s Day became a national holiday in England in the early 15th century, remaining until the tradition dwindled after the union with Scotland in the late 18th century.

Since then, the day has become a rather low-key affair, unlike the Irish celebration of St Patrick’s Day or Scottish observance of St Andrew’s Day. However, this year has seen a resurgence in marking the day with a feast in Trafalgar Square and Prime Minister David Cameron calling for people to celebrate what it is to be English.

But for a lot of people in England, the day will have little relevance, passing by with little celebration or acknowledgement.

Image credit: Getty

What do you think? Should Saint George’s Day be celebrated in England more?

 

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